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Deathly Hallows, no spoilers.

Done with TDH.

I picked up my copy in a bookstore instead of ordering it from Amazon, since I was pretty sure it was going to be quicker than getting it delivered. Turns out I was right -- several friends of mine who ordered it were still waiting for their copy at four in the afternoon.

Took me a little less than six hours to get through it, and that's because I had to force myself not to skip anything. But I'm done now, and I have to say, I really admire JKR. It's a wonderful, tightly plotted book; there are so many insignificant details from previous books that are suddenly vital to the plot. I'm awed.

I'll have to reread it in a few days. I wonder how it's going to feel when I'm no longer quite so eager to find out how it all ends, who lives and who dies.

Comments

( 5 comments — Leave a comment )
calkat4
Jul. 23rd, 2007 07:02 pm (UTC)
I take it you liked it then? I enjoyed it a lot, but I tried to drag it out as much as possible because I was a little sad that it's over. Not devastated like other fans (who are mad for more than just the fact that it's over).

My eldest sister is the super HP fan in the family and when I randomly visited her friends page I was subjected to link after link of people saying how they hated the book because it destroyed their fandom and how the book was so full of plot holes.

There is just so much detail in the novels that right now all the plot holes are over my head. Maybe I'll pick up on a couple when they relay them.

Any thoughts on DH or the fandom?
technoelfie
Jul. 23rd, 2007 07:16 pm (UTC)
I did enjoy it quite a bit. It didn't make me cry, though. I was never that much into HP.

What I liked was how well the universe was crafted. There will always be inconsistencies and plot holes and whatnot; one can never create the perfect fictional universe after all. Besides, in Rowling's case there are a hell of a lot of people looking for mistakes. I imagine that creates a lot of pressure.

As far as I'm concerned she performed very well despite all the expectations. The book was well-written. It didn't affect me emotionally, but that's not JKR's fault.

As far as the developments in DH are concerned, I really liked how Dumbledore turned out to be such a morally ambiguous character. I found it very interested that Harry didn't get him at all. It underscored the fact that Harry is pretty mediocre as far as his intellectual faculties go.

The pairings simply bored me. I've always thought that Hermione is wasted on Ron. Ginny is welcome to Harry--I never viewed him as a prize either.

Kreacher's redemption was a stroke of genius. The fact that Hermione was the one who understood him best and felt compassion for him was a nice bit of continuity.

As far as the fandom goes I think there will always be extremes. I'm not fond of haters in any fandom, just as I am not fond of people who present their views as the one and only truth. That's why I tend to drift away from communities after a while even if the topic interests me: I simply can't deal with people. :)
calkat4
Jul. 24th, 2007 06:00 am (UTC)
I didn't quite cry, thought about it, but the only deaths that would have gotten me were off screen and then also when Harry said, 'Does it hurt?' That touched me. The simple things really work for me.

Dumbledore's history made him more real of a character to me because I felt that he was just so high and mighty and wise and perfect that it just hurt. But he had his downfalls which brought him down a few pegs for me.

And Kreacher? I never thought that I would have liked him nearly as much as I ended up. He was so heartfelt within his loyalties for the family.

And Hermione and Ron? Hmm, personally I don't like them too much, but they are tolerable. I think that it was a storybook romance (haphazard, charming boy spends time with uptight, brainy girl and they just come together). I never really spotted the development of why they work and how they like each other. Maybe going through life-threatening situations brings people closer?

I've actually liked Harry and Ginny throughout the books. I just love how she accepts Harry's decision in book 6. She's such a smart girl.

The one thing I didn't understand was that they're childhood loves are always who they marry (with the exception of Tonks/Lupin). I mean, can't they meet someone after Hogwarts or what? I'm sure someone could come along and prove me wrong, but that's just how it comes off to me.

As for Fandom, I don't appreciate how they rage at the author as if the characters aren't hers and how she 'ruins' them. How? They are her characters and she can do what she wants with them. It really baffles me.
technoelfie
Jul. 25th, 2007 03:27 pm (UTC)
The one thing I didn't understand was that they're childhood loves are always who they marry (with the exception of Tonks/Lupin).

I suppose Rowling did that because these are the characters the readers know and are invested in. It's easier than bringing in someone completely new, or creating a pairing (like Hermione/Blaise for example) that hasn't been prepared throughout the books.

I also think it was more important to her to show the next generation than to actually decide who would marry who. It was more about symbolism than anything. Of course, I could be completely wrong about this.

As to fandom, I really dislike the overall feeling of entitlement, and some of the comments mentioning how this or that fandom writer could have done a better job on this final book. It's all so narrow-minded and stupid.
calkat4
Jul. 27th, 2007 03:18 am (UTC)
I like your idea on how she married those that she had invested time in. It makes sense. Today, I read an article about her thoughts about the epilogue, and boy, was it interesting. But without going over everything that she mentioned, the point I wanted to bring up was her thoughts on Luna/Neville.

She said that at first she never saw the two getting together, let alone liking each other, and then finally she said she 'felt a pull' between them. The reason that she hadn't included them was because she said it felt too 'neat.'

So in response, even though the relationships with Ron/Hermione and Harry/Ginny were developed, the latter a little less so, don't those feel neat, or can I go as far as trite?

As to fandom, I really dislike the overall feeling of entitlement, and some of the comments mentioning how this or that fandom writer could have done a better job on this final book. It's all so narrow-minded and stupid

I completely agree. Personally, I can only think of three decent reasons for the epilogue: to show the next gen, to show Harry's lack of prejudice against the Slytherin house and the fabulous line of 'He was the bravest man I ever knew.'

Maybe you'll have more compelling reasons that hold a more water than mine.
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